Namati

São José dos Campos, São Paulo
Brazil

+55 11 989741403

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Network Champion: Main point of contact for this organization. Maintains this page and ensures organization makes the most of network membership.
Daniel Lopes Faggiano


Added on: Aug 07, 2019

Our organization works in Brazil and Chile. Our mission is to contribute to human emancipation. Main programs: Early Warning System, Community development, Legal empowerment and Environment Justice.

Maíra Institute is a non-profit Brazilian civil society organization that aims to contribute to the emancipation of traditional peoples and communities by strengthening the principle of self-determination.

Our projects conceived in the perspective of the fight against poverty and the protection of the environment. We aim to stimulate the discovery of  the potential of each people so that, each one can improve their private, family and community quality of life.

Our goal is to promote sustainable human development through the overcoming of this sociability of consumption and extreme violence. We seek to apply in an integrated way: scientific research programs, adapted environmental technologies, agroecological systems, education, income generation and articulation with the other emancipatory movements.

Articulated in a network, we intend to jointly awaken a lucid and sovereign consciousness about the construction of our reality.

Our institute is a human and environmental rights organization that works for human emancipation through knowledge exchange, articulation and strengthening of local voices and the promotion of community-led development. In harmony with the yearnings of the whole human race, we envision a world in which each community can reflect critically about its present and thus consciously determine its future.

PEOPLE ASSOCIATED WITH THIS ORGANIZATION

Daniel Lopes Faggiano

Since my early days I drove my attention to Brazilian social issues. Living in a country with a high level of violence and corruption always forced me to look for solutions to our social problems. That was one of the reasons that made me decide to study law at university. I took one of the best law courses in Brazil at Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo – which has an important history of fighting against the dictatorial military government in the past. More than learn about legal issues, state organization and democracy, international humanitarian law and human rights, I also improved my critical examination of on the relationship between capitalism, development and poverty. Later, I took a master’s in social science at the same institution with the emeritus professor Dr. Carmen Junqueira. The classes gave me a deeper understanding of the critical theory, international development, social and economic changes, and the impact of such changes on communities, development actors and governments. During this time, I also worked on the ground with difference indigenous people from various cultures. As a part of this work, I assisted indigenous communities in creating representative bodies, local associations, cooperatives and indigenous study groups. Following the completion of my master’s course, I worked for three years with the Kayapó indigenous people. During these years, I assisted them in the implementation of their self-determination right, having the opportunity to develop strategies and political links in the defense of the indigenous’ rights. I had the opportunity to participate in assemblies with important Kayapo chiefs, which gave me the chance to establish a close relationship with Chief Raoni, one of the most internationally renowned indigenous chiefs; through that experience I learnt important leadership lessons. Working with these warrior indigenous leaders allowed me to understand better how important it is to know the right way to approach complex problems, how to understand the requirements, to propose solutions and to help them to solve their problems. While my knowledge of indigenous issues grew, I took several leadership actions, including organizing meetings between the Kayapó and relevant actors, such as the Brazilian Ministry of Justice, deputies, senators and Supreme Court members. In 2017, I actively participated in the conception and creation of a non-profit civil society organization. I am the first president of Instituto Maíra. Our institute is a human and environmental rights organization that works for human emancipation through knowledge exchange, articulation and strengthening of local voices and the promotion of community-led development. In harmony with the yearnings of the whole human race, we envision a world in which each community can reflect critically about its present and thus consciously determine its future.

Brazil

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