• Join
  •     |    
  • Login
  •     |    
Log in
Join

Rights and Gender in Vietnam

By: Gina Alvarado, Khuat Thu Hong, Stella Mukasa, Zayid Douglas, Jennifer Schutzman, Nguyen Thi Van Anh, Nguyen Thi Phuong, Thao Vu Xuan Thai

In Vietnam, everyone is born with equal rights, which are protected by law without any distinction. Citizens are equally entitled to the same rights and obligations without discrimination based on gender, religion, or wealth. Equal rights should be reflected in all areas of life, especially in economics, politics, culture, and the judicial system. Though women and men are equal under Vietnam’s laws, women often are denied their rights in practice. This is especially true regarding their rights around property and land, which are very much tied to culture and custom. This module teaches CVGEAs about human rights, property and land rights, as well as what the law of Vietnam says about women’s and men’s equality. It creates space for safe discussion and exploration of participants’ own views on gender equality and the relationship of culture to women’s rights.

The Law on the Rights and Gender Issues include:

• Constitution of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam

• The Civil Code

• The Marriage and Family Law

• The Law on Gender Equality

Gender equality is not a new element in the law of Vietnam. The Constitution of 1946 states that women and men are equal. Women’s equality to men’s under the law is also mentioned in the Constitution of 1959, 1980, 1992 and its amendment in 20013 , as well as the Constitution of 20134 . Vietnam also has a law on Gender Equality. The 2006 law on Gender Equality highlights the quality of women’s rights in Vietnam. The Social Insurance Law (2006), Law on Residence (2006), the Law on Domestic Violence Prevention (2007), and the Nationality Act (2008) also contain provisions to protect the rights of women. Accordingly, some specific rights guaranteed women: equality; freedom of speech; labor rights; social security and social welfare protections; the right to vote or stand for election; the right to participate in social management, state management; freedom of religion; inviolable rights body, life, and health; the right to respect, honor, and dignity.

Start the discussion at community.namati.org

Download Resource
Share:      
Uploaded on: Jun 10, 2016
Year Published: 2015
Resource Tags
Resource Type

Target Population

Languages

Regions